Questions on The Ultimate Survivors

Science News For Kids - Fri, 2015-01-30 10:46
Questions for Desert plants: The ultimate survivors
Categories: Science & Math News

Desert plants: The ultimate survivors

Science News For Kids - Fri, 2015-01-30 08:00
Creosote, mesquite and other desert plants rely on different adaptations to thrive, even when no rain falls for an entire year.
Categories: Science & Math News

Fast sea level rise is a very recent change

Science News For Kids - Thu, 2015-01-29 08:00
Sea levels have been rising for more than a century. But that rise is now speeding up. That suggests that what is driving the rise — climate change — also has increased dramatically in recent years.
Categories: Science & Math News

Immunity: Environment can have big impact

Science News For Kids - Wed, 2015-01-28 08:00
A study on twins suggests that environmental factors can shape a person's immune system more than genes do.
Categories: Science & Math News

How birds stay in the air

Science News For Kids - Tue, 2015-01-27 08:00
The sensors inside a boxy device measure the forces generated with each stroke of a bird’s wings. Learning how much force is needed to keep a bird aloft could help in designing future drones that flap, hover and dart.
Categories: Science & Math News

A new ‘spin’ on concussions

Science News For Kids - Tue, 2015-01-27 08:00
Scientists have suspected that rotational forces in the brain may underlie concussions. A new study used athletic mouthguards containing sensors. Data on head movements during collisions suggest that a twisting of the brain may underlie mild brain injuries, including concussion.
Categories: Science & Math News

Machine simulates the sun’s core

Science News For Kids - Mon, 2015-01-26 14:00
A machine heats iron atoms to temperatures that match the interior of the sun. This has helped solve a solar mystery.
Categories: Science & Math News

Resilient hearts for deep-sea divers

Science News For Kids - Mon, 2015-01-26 08:00
How do aquatic mammals have enough energy to hunt prey while steeply dropping their heart rate to stay underwater? A new study of dolphins and seals provides clues.
Categories: Science & Math News

Ongoing Ebola outbreak traced to hollow tree

Science News For Kids - Fri, 2015-01-23 14:00
Scientists suspect the current Ebola outbreak started with bats that lived in a hollow tree in Guinea. The outbreak's first victim, a two-year-old boy, often played in the tree.
Categories: Science & Math News

New germ fighter turns up in dirt

Science News For Kids - Fri, 2015-01-23 14:00
Scientists have found a compound in soil that can kill the microbes that cause anthrax, tuberculosis and other diseases.
Categories: Science & Math News

Tides may regularly swamp many U.S. cities

Science News For Kids - Fri, 2015-01-23 08:15
As sea levels rise, many cities will begin to experience frequent and extensive flooding at high tides. In some areas — even Washington, D.C. — such flooding could become a weekly headache.
Categories: Science & Math News

Questions for Tides Swamp U.S. Cities

Science News For Kids - Fri, 2015-01-23 08:00
Questions for Tides Swamp U.S. Cities
Categories: Science & Math News

Air pollution can mess with our DNA

Science News For Kids - Thu, 2015-01-22 08:00
New research suggests a type of air pollution — diesel fumes — can affect your health. It inappropriately switches some genes on, while turning off others.
Categories: Science & Math News

Finalists named for major teen competition in Washington

Science News For Kids - Wed, 2015-01-21 13:12
Forty teen researchers have been selected to compete in the Intel Science Talent Search. The event — a program of Society for Science & the Public — will take place in Washington, D.C., March 5 to11.
Categories: Science & Math News

A whale of a lifespan

Science News For Kids - Tue, 2015-01-20 08:00
Bowhead whales can live more than 200 years. The secret to such longevity may lie in the Arctic species’ genes. Scientists recently mapped the whale’s genetic code. They found features that protect the marine mammal against cancer and other problems related to old age.
Categories: Science & Math News

Cold noses nurture colds

Science News For Kids - Mon, 2015-01-19 08:00
The common cold infects the nose. Scientists long have known the virus grows better there, but not why. Now, a study finds the body’s defenses simply don’t work as well under the nose’s slightly cooler temperatures.
Categories: Science & Math News

Black holes are on collision course

Science News For Kids - Sun, 2015-01-18 08:00
But be patient. The distant galactic smashup is still some million years away.
Categories: Science & Math News

Virtual wounds: Computers probe healing

Science News For Kids - Fri, 2015-01-16 08:01
To better understand how the body heals wounds, scientists have begun creating computer programs that let virtual cells fight it out. These ‘computer games’ could lead to better medicines.
Categories: Science & Math News

Questions for Virtual Wounds: Computers probe healing

Science News For Kids - Fri, 2015-01-16 08:00
SCIENCEBefore reading:1.    Why do live-action movies rely on computer effects for some scenes? What are some of the advantages of doing so?2.    How does your body respond to a scrape or cut? What visible changes occur, from the moment of injury through the healing process?During reading:1.    What is the “mission” of inflammatory cells?2.    What manages the process of inflammation?3.    Provide an example of a mistake that inflammatory cells might make.4.    Define “agent-based modeling.”5.    Why is agent-based modeling so helpful in studying complex environments?6.    Describe the unexpected behavior that emerged on the virtual battlefield created for the movie.
Categories: Science & Math News

Rewritable paper: Prints with light, not ink

Science News For Kids - Thu, 2015-01-15 08:00
Rewritable paper could save money, preserve forests and cut down on waste — and all without using any ink.
Categories: Science & Math News
 

NSF logo This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DUE-0840824. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.