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  • Do you have a big decimals test coming up? Or are you studying for your standardized math test? This site is both fun and helpful! On this site you can review the following topics: place values of decimals, how to read decimals, expanded notation for decimals, and how to convert fractions into decimals. On this site you can also review how to add, subtract, multiply, and divide decimals. You will also learn about terminating and repeating decimals.

    From: MSP2 Virtual Learning Experiences: http://www.coolmath.com/prealgebra/02-decimals/index.html
  • The Decimals Cruncher game will help you learn about decimal operations! You can choose to practice adding, subtracting, multiplying, or dividing. You can also pick how hard the game is. The game has 4 levels: easy, medium, hard, and killer. The Decimals Cruncher will keep track of your score. When you switch to a new operation (addition, subtraction, multiplication, or division), your score will start over again.

  • In this game, you must defend the moon! You are the commander of a tank on a desert moon. Aliens from Vraktu VII are attacking the base to steal its energy. Defend the base!

    From: MSP2 Virtual Learning Experiences: http://www.kidsastronomy.com/games/defender/index.html
  • This site will help you to practice math while reviewing science! Disaster math has five great mathematical problems that discuss the effects and aftermath of earthquakes. When you are finished attempting the problems you can check your score!

  • Hacker is in the neighborhood, so the Cybersquad is hiding. It’s time to use the power of disguise and combination to fool him! Digit has gathered a bunch of wigs, beards, and glasses for the kids to use. Your job is to figure out how many different disguises the kids can make.

    From: MSP2 Virtual Learning Experiences: http://pbskids.org/cyberchase/games/combinations/
  • Once upon a time, a funny looking dragon found a magic donut. The donut was magical because it would double as many times as it was told to. The dragon was very hungry so it told the donut to double twenty times. This is the story of what happened next!

    From: MSP2 Virtual Learning Experiences: http://pbskids.org/cyberchase/games/doubling/
  • This is a great earth science review game! Your goal is to turn all of the red cubes blue by answering earth science questions correctly. You will see questions about space, map projections, rocks, and much more!

    From: MSP2 Virtual Learning Experiences: http://www.tasagraphicarts.com/activities/TasaGeoCube.html
  • By watching this National Geographic video, you will learn how a family was saved from an 8.8 magnitude earthquake that occurred February 27, 2010 in Chile.

  • This site contains questions about earthquakes from students just like you! Mr. John Lahr from U.S. Geological Survey answered the questions and the information has been put up for you to read! If you hit the "back" button on this page, you can also play a word-search, a crossword puzzle, and try your hand at scrambled definitions.

    From: MSP2 Virtual Learning Experiences: http://www.iol.ie/~dromore/Classes/earthquakes/questions.htm
  • Finding the words in these word searches will help you learn about earthquakes. The words in the puzzles may be hidden horizontally, vertically, diagonally, forward, or backward. To circle a discovered word, mouse-click on one end of the word and mouse-drag to the other end of the word. Once a word is found, it will be taken off the list. There are nine word searches that you can play: famous seismologists, general earthquake terms, magnitude, Mercalli Intensity Scale, plate names, plate tectonics, Richter Magnitude Scale, seismic waves, and tsunamis.

    From: MSP2 Virtual Learning Experiences: http://earthquake.usgs.gov/learn/kids/wordsearch/
 

NSF logo This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. DUE-0840824. Any opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the National Science Foundation.